Send SYM to Others

ABOG/Ali Baba the Oaktown Griot

San Francisco, CA [HipHop, R&B, Reggae]

 
 
1 2 3 4 5
4.86 Rating | 7 Votes | 3522 Views |
Treat me like your man by AB the OG
  1. Slave
  2. Treat me like your man
  3. Trying to get mine
  4. XBeverly
  5. XXJailbreak
  6. XXXRoughTrade
  7. XXXXPanther Piss (Rated X)
Ali Baba Mwongozi is Ali Baba the Oaktown Griot, a native Oaklander who had his first recording contract at age 15. As lead singer for the group “The Shades of Soul,” he choreographed the routines that helped The Shades compete successfully in Bay Area talent shows during the early 1970’s. Mwongozi joined “God’s Creation”, another local doo-wop-and-step singing group, managed at the time by Lenny Williams, then lead singer for world-renowned band “Tower of Power.” Mwongozi next formed a band called “ZAM FAMily Band,” sang lead vocals and played timbales. Mwongozi moved in 1976, relocating to the Pacific Northwest where he joined his brother Rudi. Ali enrolled at Portland Community College. “Colleges and universities are where all of the really dynamic artistic stuff is occurring. ‘Tribe’ and ‘Fresh’ were two bands that I hung out with. Some of the members of these bands eventually became ‘Pleasure’ who had a couple of gold records. The Muslim Arts Collective (MAC) formed by Rudi, was also kicked off during that time. I was a part of ‘MAC’, playing marimba, timbales, and other percussion.” The Mwongozi brothers returned to the Bay Area in 1980. A band was formed with Ali on timbales, Rudi on piano, and James Lewis playing bass. “Other artists from the area played in or around the unit from time to time, including Muhammed (Tsofiosaam) Kaal, Rasul Saddiq, Diane Witherspoon, and Lady Bianca, to name just a few.” In 1987, Ali met the nucleus of what was to become “Ali Baba & the Fresh 40”, a reggae band. He sang lead vocals, played keyboard, and wrote and arranged the repertoire. The 40 Thieves, as they were known locally, were featured at Reggae Bash 1987. The band was a local favorite during a time when the “world music” scene in the Bay Area was flourishing. “We were in direct competition with groups like “The Freaky Executives,” “Strictly Roots,” “George and the Wonders,” “Lambs Bread,” and “Upskank,” but we were the only world music band that had a lead singing keyboardist who tore up his keyboard after the show. We had the only guitarist who would play solos that invoked images of Jimi Hendrix, while he walked around the bar on top of the tables. Plus we had an unrepentant extrovert of a drummer and the only five-string bass player around.” Ali put the band to rest in 1990, opened up a bookstore in East Oakland, and immersed himself in the Oakland rap scene. He had some cameo appearances on shows with groups from such labels as Oaktown Records, Ray-Town Records, Dangerous Music. Rap, particularly gangster-type rap, began to be of increasing interest to Ali; he began to tailor his sound to the underground. Ali Baba released his first tape, “Dis ‘n Dat” in the summer of 1992. In the spring of 1993, Ali put out an LP titled “White Lotus Catalogue.” In the winter of 1994, Ali released an EP titled “Black Rage!,” the first of his efforts to be carried in record stores. The songs were well-received and Ali went to work on trying to complete the album, until circumstances caused the loss of all of his equipment and some completed songs. With no equipment or songs, Ali rejoined Jah Bonz and started creating the songs on “AB the OG: From debasement to de-penthouse.” “The songs are really just some things I wanted to share musically before I move on to the next stuff I want to work on. When a pauper shares his last crust of bread with you, needless to say, it’s a sacrifice, but you know it’s from the heart.” Ali Baba Mwongozi is currently working on a screenplay called “The Kan Kings.” His next rap album, to be released on CD, is entitled “Twenty Seconds in the Mind of the Average Black Male.” He has plans for an album of instrumental works with the working title “Sonata for the Black Keys. He is also in the treatment phase of a novel called “I Grew Up in Pantherville,” based on the true-to-life experiences of a young African American boy growing up in Oakland during the civil rights era.
Add Comment (max length 255 characters)
WarChild/All Work No Play Ent.
{ 09-12-2007 01:16 }
Very very! Nice.... I enjoyed listening. 5
NBCboyz ...The Swag..
{ 07-01-2007 17:55 }
nice tracks nice verses
Ghost Black
{ 06-29-2007 10:50 }
you get a 5 from me. you sound awesome. thats taking me back in the day's. thats when music was all love, no hate. that's respect from me. peace
Mr. My City
{ 06-28-2007 18:40 }
What up doe! U got some heat mayne, no doubt! I had to give you dat 5 piece, keep doin it! Please rate my showcase.
BUDDY BLACK
{ 06-13-2007 01:03 }
FO SHO WHAT PART? GET AT ME MAIN BUDDYBLACK205@YAHOO.COM
BUDDY BLACK
{ 06-12-2007 23:44 }
OK HOMIE I SEE YAH STAY SMASHIN MAN I AH FAN OF THIS KIND OF MUSIC ALLDAY !!STAY IN TOUCH MAN KEEP ME UP ON YAH HMIE!!
Bojeezy
Bojeezy says:
{ 06-12-2007 14:46 }
ey keep doin ya thing man. i like the style and where ya going. wanted to make sure i came thru and showed some love. holla back
HollyWood Cuzz
{ 06-12-2007 14:09 }
THANKS 4 THE COMMENT CUZ AND B4 CCC WE WAS THE STREET POLITICIANS STAY UP
DANNA
DANNA says:
{ 06-12-2007 03:16 }
COOL AND UNIQUE MUSIC! KEEP IT UP..GIVIN U A 5..DANNA
Young Jims
{ 06-12-2007 03:01 }
ALL OF IT SOUNDS GOOD AND UNIQUE I VOTED YOU A 5 ALL DAY RETURN THE VOTE ON MY SHOWCASE ALWAYS KEEP UP THE HARD WORK AND YOU WILL MAKE IT MOS DEF GOD BLESS
HollyWood Cuzz
{ 06-11-2007 21:46 }
LIVE FROM HOLLYGROVE,NEW ORLEANS--KEEP IT POPPIN CUZ-HOLLA
STEVEN J (ChicaGo)
{ 06-11-2007 16:03 }
very nice sounds, Anyone can create musik but originality comes from the heart and mind, Def. hear talent in your tune, 5 all day for creativity, Return the opinion and vote, it matterz to us, GOD BLESS